Category Archives: Commentary

Free showing of “1984” film at Loft Cinema

Free Screening!

1984

nineteen_eighty_four_xlg

Join us for a special free screening of the classic film version of George Orwell’s chillingly prophetic novel, 1984, on April 4th, the day Orwell’s protagonist Winston Smith begins rebelling against his oppressive government by keeping a forbidden diary.

TUESDAY, APRIL 4 AT 7:30PM | FREE ADMISSION at Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd.

Presented by the University of Arizona Department of English and The Loft Cinema.

“A dystopian, futuristic society trapped in a state of perpetual war, omnipresent government surveillance and public manipulation.    A tyrannical political leader known as “Big Brother.”  An average citizen who dreams of rebellion.

Join us for a special free screening of the classic film version of George Orwell’s chillingly prophetic novel, 1984, starring John Hurt and Richard Burton. The screening date of April 4 is also the day Orwell’s protagonist Winston Smith begins rebelling against his oppressive government by keeping a forbidden diary. Over 90 independent cinemas in the U.S. will be banding together to screen 1984 on April 4.

Following the film will be a talkback and panel discussion on the novel’s relevancy to our current political climate, featuring Christopher Cokinos, UA Department of English; Marcia Klotz, UA Department of English; and Bradley Schauer, UA School of Theatre, Film and Television.

Come early to meet representatives from local organizations doing important work in our community at an outdoor Activist Fair, starting at 6:00pm and presented by The Loft Cinema.   Groups scheduled to appear include ACLU of Arizona; Colibri Center for Human Rights; Planned Parenthood of Southern Arizona; Southern Arizona AIDS Foundation; Tucson Audubon Society; and YWCA Tucson.  Copies of Orwell’s novel will also be available for sale at this event, courtesy of local independent bookstore, Mostly Books.

This stunning screen adaptation of George Orwell’s prophetic 1948 novel envisions a world in which the government completely controls the masses by controlling their thoughts, altering history and even changing the meaning of words to suit its needs. The film is set during April of 1984 in post-atomic war London, the capital city of the repressive totalitarian state of Oceania. Winston Smith (John Hurt) is a government bureaucrat whose job is rewriting history and erasing people from existence. While his co-worker Parsons (Gregor Fisher) seems content to follow the state’s laws, Winston starts to write in a secret diary despite the fact the Big Brother is watching everyone at all times by way of monitors. He silently suffers and tries to comprehend his oppression, which forbids individual human behaviors such as free thinking and sex. He meets Julia (Suzanna Hamilton), who works for the Ministry of Truth, and they engage in a stoic love affair. They are soon found out, and Winston is interrogated and tortured by his former friend O’Brien (Richard Burton in his final film appearance). This second adaptation of Orwell’s classic novel (the first was released in 1956) was directed by acclaimed filmmaker Michael Radford (Il Postino: The Postman). (Dir. by Michael Radford, 1984, UK, 113 mins., Rated R)”

Special thanks to our community partners:

ACLU (local website/national website)

Colibri Center for Human Rights

Planned Parenthood (local website/national website)

Southern Arizona AIDS Foundation

YWCA Tucson

Tucson Audubon Society

International Day of Happiness: Do Happy Today schedule

Do Happy Today Partners Weekend, March 18 and 19

  • 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., March 18: Tucson Habitat for Humanity Do Happy Today “Rainbow Build” at Copper Vista II, 5761 S. Copper Plate Drive. To volunteer, contact Joseph Howell at 520.260.9959 or joseph@habitattucson.org
  • 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., March 18: DHT at Rillito Bend Neighborhood and Tucson Valley of the Moon Home/Garden Art Tour and Live Happy Wall, 2544 E. Allen Road. Bring your Walkabout Talkabout Book. Free download atwww.communityrenaissance.biz .
  • March 18-20: 10:30 a.m., March 18: Storytime on Happiness at Himmel Park Branch, Pima County Public Library, 1035 N. Treat Ave. March 18-20:People can fill out a blank flower-shaped paper available at the library’s information desk and answer “What makes me happy?” or “How do I share happiness?” (520.594.5305 or www.library.pima.gov/himmel)
  • 10 a.m.-2:00 p.m., March 18: Celebrate Historic South Park Community at Park Ave. Between 27th Street and 31st Street. Family activities, food, music and more. Contact Glenn Davis (520) 870-8109.
  • 4 to 6 p.m., March 19: Limberlost Neighborhood Association Community Fair, Limberlost Park, 4255 N 4th Ave. Café 54 Food Truck (invited), Live Happy Wall, Architectural Design Display for City of Tucson first feng shui well-being path, Limberlost Little Free Library and info from various community groups. Bring your Walkabout Talkabout Book. Free download atwww.communityrenaissance.biz/happyu. City of Tucson’s Do Happy TodayProclamation will be featured at the event.

Continue reading

Fasten Your Seatbelts, The Ride Is About To Get Bumpy – AZ Budget Time Is Nigh

By Craig McDermott, crossposted from Random Musings

Traditionally, a session of the Arizona legislature is suppose to be 100 days long.

It’s not a requirement, in terms of the law or legislative rules, but it’s definitely seen as something to strive for. During most years, the 100th day of a session falls in mid- to late- April.

This year, the 100th day falls on April 18th.

The one specific duty that the lege has is to formulate a budget for the state.

Of course, being the lege, their focus is on doing many things *to* the state before doing anything *for* the state…and they use that budget that is supposed to be for the state as a vehicle for doing things to the state, but I digress…

So naturally, they wait until they are well more than halfway to the hundred day goal before even considering a budget.

From Mary Jo Pitzl of the Arizona Republic –

Inauguration Day

As the Hemingway of Twitter, Donald J. Trump, would tweet: “So true . . . SAD!

Cartoon_50

Deference to the Founding Fathers: Need It Be Blind?

We Americans revere the founding fathers and instinctively defer to them.

Should we?

At best, the founding fathers were a group of really smart guys (literally, mind you, as no women were included). At worst, they were self-interested aristocrats who sought to create a system that would perpetuate their position (and that of their descendants) in American society.

They were not omniscient.

Their foresight was limited.

Expressions that justify half-assed legislation, such as “politics is the art of the possible” and “never let the perfect get in the way of the good,” all applied to the negotiation of the Constitution. Many, many compromises were required to reach a final product. Which means some of the Constitution’s provisions represent a least common denominator, rather than pearls of wisdom. Case in point: The three-fifths compromise.

Which means when you find yourself deferring to the wisdom of the founding fathers, you need to ask yourself if you’re just being intellectually lazy as a means of justifying the result you like, but can’t otherwise justify.

So it is with the current debate regarding the electoral college, which involves two distinct, yet often conflated, questions: Continue reading

Arizona Legislature – The coming week

By Craig McDermott, crossposted from Random Musings

They lege has “improved” its website, making it considerably more user-unfriendly.  As such, the format of this post may change over time as I figure out the best way to utilize the new website.

Notes:


All committees meetings and agendas are subject to change without notice, and frequently do.  If you plan to travel to the Capitol to observe or weigh in on the consideration of a particular measure, check with the lege ahead of time to confirm that the meeting that you are interested in is still on schedule and your item(s) of interest is still on the agenda for that meeting.


Meeting rooms designated “HHR” are in the House of Representatives building. Meeting rooms designated “SHR” are in the Senate building. 

When the phrase “looks harmless” is used, it only means that any harm to AZ that would be wrought by the bills on the agenda isn’t apparent to me as of this writing.  However, if you notice any nuggets of ugly that I miss, please leave a comment that makes me and other readers aware of the situation.

Most bills are assigned to at least two committees – one standing committee and the chambers’ rules committees.  A few are assigned to more than that because they cover areas that fall under the jurisdiction of more than one standing committee.  A select few are assigned to three or more standing committees.  That’s the way that a chamber’s leadership tells it membership that it doesn’t want a particular bill to pass.

Because of the MLK holiday, many of the committees that meet on Mondays will not meet this week or will meet on days other than Monday.

House side –

Appropriations – Tuesday, 9 a.m., HHR1.  House Appropriations and Senate Appropriation will be holding a joint meeting to receive thgovernor‘s 2017 budget proposal.

Continue reading