Monty Python films at the Loft on every Wednesday in October

And now for something completely Python…

Always look on the bright side of life and prepare for a massive month of Monty Python on the big screen as The Loft Cinema presents a moving tribute to killer rabbits, silly walks and dead parrots – it’s guaranteed to be more fun than the Spanish Inquisition! Monty Python’s Flying Circus started as a television show in 1969, growing exponentially in popularity with each passing year until finally, in 1971, the first Monty Python movie appeared,And Now For Something Completely Different. British comedy would never be the same again. Drawing on the crackpot genius of its members (including Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Michael Palin, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle and Terry Jones, to name only the proverbial few), the Python troupe combined brainy satire with utterly ridiculous nonsense to create a new brand of surreal comedy that inspired generations of performers. Following the success of their first film, more (and increasingly hilarious) Monty Python movies arrived at intervals of every few years, even after the original, legendary television series went off the air in 1973. From the outrageous satire of The Life of Brian to the quotable insanity of The Holy Grail to the warped fantasy of Gilliam’sTime Bandits and beyond, the films of Monty Python prove that comedy may be nice, but a shrubbery is ever nicer.

Meaningoflifewebposter

Be there at the Loft Cinema, 3233 E. Speedway Blvd. at 7 p.m.  for all 5 Wednesdays in October:

October 1: Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life

October 8: Life of Brian

October 15: And Now for Something Completely Different

October 22: Time Bandits

October 29: Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Carolyn’s note:  We used to live in England, U.K. so my family enjoys this weird British humor. And my professor husband was at a medieval conference in 2012 when Python Terry Jones presented about his recent book of interest to medievalists (obviously)” The Medieval Python, the Purposive and Provocative works of Terry Jones”.   He must know a lot about the Middle Ages.

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