Tag Archives: Paul Amiel

Celebrate 5th Anniversary of Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson

On January 15, 2013 Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson formally opened its doors to showcase a beautiful, tranquil Japanese Garden in the Southwest desert of Tucson, Arizona.  Celebrate it’s 5th anniversary on Sat. January 13, 2018.  “Yume” means dream in Japanese, which it was as the creation by Owner/E.D. Patricia Deridder, who lived in Japan for 15 years.

Odaiko Sonora, Tucson’s taiko drumming group (pictured below), will be performing at 1:30 and 3 p.m.  UPDATE: Schedule below.

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“X is for Xenophobia: I am America” art show

 

Opening reception for this unique  art show is on  Saturday Feb. 4, from 6 to 9 pm. at Steinfeld Warehouse, 101 W. 6th St.  More than 25 artists are participating.

Artist’s statement: “What is XENOPHOBIA? It is defined as an irrational fear and hatred of strangers or foreigners or of anything that is strange or foreign. The rise of populism is accompanied by, and often explicitly espouses, xenophobia and racism. At the same time, there are signs that wide and heterogeneous alliances are being formed against these trends, both within traditional politics and out in the world, in communities.” (statement continued below)

Mediterannean music will be performed by Kyklo (Paul Amiel, Anton Shekerjiev, Kelsey Shea).  They describe their music as: “music of the mountain villages, ancient islands, hashish dens, cafés, harems, pubs, dance halls, cloisters, and prisons of the old world, on traditional acoustic instruments.”

Kyklo – L to R: Paul Amiel, Kelsey Shea, Anton Shekerjiev,)

Artist’s statement continued:

“The destruction caused by wars without end, driven by forces and actors far from the battlefields, has created not only the desperate flight of refugees but also decimated economies and destroyed countries to the extent that rebuilding does not even seem to be on the agenda. There are frequent deadly attacks on refugee shelters in Germany; the extreme Right is growing across Europe. In the US and elsewhere, populists are on the rise scapegoating the most vulnerable for socities’ problems.

What can the role of art be in this world we live in right now? We created an exhibition with a group of artists who use their aesthetic knowledge and craft skills to interrogate Xenophobia. These artists are interested in creating political art, activist art, interventionist art, socially engaged art, and/or social practice art addressing Xenophobia.

The xenophobic and racist propaganda is deeply rooted in the political landscape of today and it is coming both from “above” (powerful elites) and “below” (working-classes). How can we (as artists) contribute resources to combat it? We need to know the terrain to fight back and use the their tools and rules to our advantage. The tools of the game are signs, symbols, story and spectacle. We are artists. We have used these tools for years. We are well equipped but I believe we need to collaborate and create big, ground breaking exhibitions and use our networks in this struggle. If we, like minded artists, do not do it, who else will?

The aim of this exhibition is to CHANGE the way a society with growing xenophobic and racist tendencies perceive the world and act in this world, with the hope to furnish resources for those groups, alliances, networks and communities struggling to build a more just, equitable and inclusive future.

If this resonates with you, please come and join us for the opening reception. February 4th, 2017 at 6pm.

The exhibition will be up until March 30, 2017. The hope is to make it a traveling exhibition in the US and abroad. We need your support to make it a reality.
If you have any questions&concerns you can contact Ozlem at ozlemayseozgur@gmail.com”

RSVP via FB: https://www.facebook.com/events/255614104872267/

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Photo Gallery of 2017 Tucson Japanese Festival

Tucson Japanese Festival (new name) was held on January 14, 2017 at PCC Downtown, 1255 N. Stone Ave. to celebrate the New Year.

For the 4th year, Southern Arizona Japanese Cultural Coalition (SAJCC) sponsored a New Year’s festival featuring numerous performances and once again, mochi pounding (from rice). Odaiko Sonora taiko drummers and Yume Japanese Gardens of Tucson were festival co-sponsors.

Origami paper folding was taught and Go, fukuwarai and kendama games were played upstairs in the campus center building.  Also on display were ikebana flower arrangements, bonsai from the Tucson Bonsai Club, and calligraphy.   Photos below courtesy of freelance photographer James Tokishi, except for last 4 photos by M. Fumie Craig.

Odaiko Sonora doing the welcome at the New Year's festival

Odaiko Sonora doing the welcome at the Tucson Japanese New Year’s festival

Mochi (rice) pounding in stone usu and wooden kine

Mochi (rice) pounding in stone usu with wooden kine

Tucson Kendo Kai performing this skill

Tucson Kendo Kai ready to perform their skills

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“88: Hachi Hachi” taiko drumming performance at the Rogue Theater

UnitSouzou

ODAIKO SONORA AND THE ROGUE THEATRE PRESENT
88: Hachi Hachi with UNIT SOUZOU

Saturday January 30, 2016
Two performances 2:30 P.M. and 7:30 P.M.

Tickets $18 in advance, $20 at the door

Call The Rogue Theatre box office at 520-551-2053 or order from our Web store. The Rogue Theatre is located at 300 E. University Blvd. (between 4th and 5th Avenues).

“Tucsonans have the rare opportunity to see two of North America’s leading taiko (Japanese ensemble drumming) performers in the intimate space of The Rogue Theatre. 88: Hachi Hachi is an intricate weaving of taiko, dance and theatre by Portland’s UNIT SOUZOU. Internationally recognized taiko performers Michelle Fujii and Toru Watanabe create a rhythmic journey investigating lineage, personal story and the space that exists between two people.

Odaiko Sonora is proud to once again partner with The Rogue Theatre to present taiko in a theatrical setting. Odaiko Sonora’s partnership with The Rogue Theatre began when Musical Director Paul Amiel borrowed a taiko in 2012 for The Rogue’s Journey to the West. The Rogue later commissioned Odaiko Sonora to score their 2013 production of Shakespeare’s Richard III, and Odaiko Sonora then presented a concert at the theatre in October, 2013.”

Carolyn’s note: The number 8 is “hachi” in Japanese, thus the name of this taiko troupe. More info about Odaiko Sonora at www.tucsontaiko.org.

Get tickets online at: http://www.theroguetheatre.org/store_tickets.htm

Photo gallery of 2nd Annual Japanese New Year’s Mochitsuki celebration

Odaiko Sonora taiko drummers welcoming in the New Year of the Sheep

Odaiko Sonora taiko drummers welcomed in the New Year of the Sheep

On January 10, 2015 the Southern Arizona Japanese Cultural Coalition (SAJCC) sponsored their 2nd Annual mochi pounding celebration for the new Year of the Sheep.  Here are photos of that lively event, held at the Rhythm Industry Performance Factory, home of Odaiko Sonora (taiko drummers), 1013 S. Tyndall Ave. All photos except for the last one taken by freelance photographer James Tokishi.

Tracy, Nicole and Karen from Odaiko Sonora pounding mochi

Tracy, Karen and Nicole from Odaiko Sonora pounding mochi

 

Odaiko Sonora taiko drummers performing

Odaiko Sonora taiko drummers performing as mochi is being pounded

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Full Moon Tales at Yume Japanese Gardens

Full Moon Tale Flyer

The full moon will set the scene on the evening of Saturday, December 6 for an original theatrical performance of the beloved Japanese folktale Kaguya Hime — The Bamboo Princess. Children and adults alike will be enchanted as performers in masks engage in storytelling, dance, and shadow play to the sound of traditional bamboo flute music and taiko drums.

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