Tag Archives: state of the state

Tucson demonstration against Gov. Ducey’s State of The State Address today

Governor Ducey will be in Tucson today to deliver a warmed-over repetition of the pablum he served up in his State of The State Address to the legislature on Monday to the Tucson Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce.

Progressive Democrats of America plan to demonstrate Against #DoubleTalkDucey:

On Tuesday, Jan. 9, Gov. Ducey will be giving a Tucson version of his State of the State speech at a $110-per-person luncheon hosted by the Tucson Chamber of Commerce. We’ll be waiting outside to show him that we’re done with his double talk, and ready to demand something better.

Frustrated by the way that Ducey claims to support public education — while refusing to pay teachers anything close to what they deserve? Infuriated by the way Ducey claims to stand for inclusivity — while continuing to support people like Joe Arpaio? Fed up with the way Ducey pretends to champion Arizona’s middle class — while supporting tax cuts for his rich friends? Join us! Bring signs and come ready to chant and speak out.

Thanks to ProgressNow Arizona, Indivisible Southern Arizona and Mi Familia Vota for organizing this action. They are asking that we meet on the sidewalk near 215 S. Granada at the Convention Center at 11:00 am on Tuesday morning.


Gov. Ducey’s State of The State Address is not well received

Our self-proclaimed “education governor,” Doug Ducey, yesterday delivered pablum in his State of  The State Address, making lofty promises of increased pubic education funding but failing to explain how he intends to pay for it. Gov. Doug Ducey’s State of the State speech: 6 big takeaways:

Education promises, but few details

Ducey focused the bulk of the education portion of his speech [2 pages out of a 17 page address] on trying to “get some facts straight” by touting improved student performance and additional K-12 spending under his administration.

Specifically, he noted that overall inflation-adjusted funding per student in Arizona has increased by 10 percent since 2015. Arizona spent an inflation-adjusted $3,782 per student in 2015, compared to $4,157 per student in 2018, according to documents from the Joint Legislative Budget Committee.

But both those figures remain below what Arizona spent per student in 2008 and are unlikely to satisfy those who argue that schools are underfunded.

A recent study by the progressive think tank Center on Budget and Policy Priorities found Arizona cut more K-12 funding than any other state between 2008 and 2015.

Ducey in his speech vowed to “restore long-standing cuts from the recession made before many of us were here.”

He listed seven specific areas — including full-day kindergarten and new school buses — where his budget would invest more dollars toward education, but he did not include details. Those details are expected in his budget proposal Friday.

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Doug Ducey the man-basher?

Crossposted from DemocraticDiva.com

In an otherwise unremarkable (for a conservative Republican governor in the pocket of Koch Industries) State of the State speech on Monday, Governor Doug Ducey said a few remarkable things. One of which was a (good, and long overdue) proposal to create a task force to address thousands of untested rape kits in Maricopa County. He has assigned Sen. Katie Hobbs, a long-time advocate for violence victims and children, to it. So far so good. (In an interesting side note, lobbyist Chris Herstam pointed out on KJZZ to host Steve Goldstein after the speech that the Governor’s announcement appeared to be a dig at Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was seated in the audience and whose office had failed to follow up on rape investigations. If you recall, Arpaio endorsed Ducey over several challengers eager for his blessing in the 2014 primary election.)

But then he said this other thing that sent ripples through social media. He announced that he had directed the state’s Department of Economic Security to start publishing the names and photos of “deadbeat dads” online. Whatever one thinks of the ethics and effectiveness of such public shaming campaigns, the likelihood of this one producing an appreciable stream of revenue to struggling single mothers is probably low. Continue reading