Two National Day of Action Events on May Day

Carolyn Classen covered the People’s Climate March coming up on Saturday, so I will cover two events scheduled for Monday, May 1, or  “May Day.”

The lesser publicized event is the “Beyond the Moment March.” Activist groups are uniting under a broader coalition they’ve dubbed “The Majority,” more than 50 partners representing black, Latino, the indigenous, LGBTQ, refugees, immigrants, laborers and the poor will collaborate from April 4 through May 1, International Worker’s Day, when they’ll launch massive protests across the country.

The idea for the Beyond the Moment March was derived from the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Beyond Vietnam” speech, in which he spoke out against racism, materialism and militarism — all broader and more-inclusive themes than his earlier anti-Jim Crow campaigns. The coalition said it chose April 4 as the kickoff for political education because that is date that King delivered the speech in 1967 and the date on which he was assassinated a year later.

The action will “go beyond moments of outrage, beyond narrow concepts of sanctuary, and beyond barriers between communities that have much at stake and so much in common,” The Majority states on its BeyondtheMoment.org website. The “Beyond the Moment” initiative kicked off on April 4 with “serious political education with our bases,” according to the website. In the weeks leading up to the mass mobilizations on May 1, they will hold public teach-ins and workshops nationwide. The desired outcome is a “broad intersectional, cross-sectoral” and influential unity on the left, activists said. We will strike, rally and resist,” said the coalition.

For more information see Mic.com, Protest groups to unite as “The Majority” for massive actions across the country on May 1, and Alternet. Diverse Protest Groups Unite As ‘The Majority,’ Aiming for Large-Scale Demonstrations on May 1st.

The second more publicized event is the Rise Up! National Day of Action, which recalls the 2006 United States immigration reform protests that reached a climax on May 1, 2006, and were nicknamed “A day without Immigrants” after the film A Day Without a Mexican.

Thomas Kennedy writes at the Huffington Post (excerpt):

On May 1 in cities, towns, and communities across the country, hundreds of thousands of people will rise up in resistance to demonstrate the power, resilience, and strength of immigrant communities and progressives in America.

Keeping families together is an American value that must be defended with all the urgency and passion we can muster.

This May Day we will continue to take to the streets to call for what we believe is a progressive platform centered on people that truly empowers and looks out for our communities. We call for a return to real and humane debate over immigration, a raise in the minimum wage to $15 an hour, the end of the for-profit prison system, affordable college education, voter restoration rights to the thousands of disenfranchised voters across the country, equal rights for the LGBTQ community, and climate justice to protect communities, such as those in Florida, that are on the front lines of climate change and sea level rise.

This May 1st join over 42 organizations across the country that make up Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM) and join the fight to protect working and immigrant families across the country, the latter which contributed $105 billion in state and local taxes and nearly $224 billion in federal taxes, according to the Partnership for a New American Economy.

America becomes a greater nation when we stand together and reject racism, hatred, and bigotry, and work together to build a better future for everyone. Find a May Day event near you at www.riseupmay1.org.

Over 90 national organizations are participating, including the Fair Immigration Reform Movement, Planned Parenthood, Sierra Club, MoveOn, Indivisible, the American Federation of Teachers, the Service Employees International Union, the Human Rights Campaign, Bend the Arc, America’s Voice, and dozens of other progressive champions.

4 Responses to Two National Day of Action Events on May Day

  1. “Activist groups are uniting under a broader coalition they’ve dubbed “The Majority,”…”

    When I read that, I chuckled. How typical of the left to lay claim to something for which they have no claim other than “they said so”. Yet, having given themselves that mantle, they will proceed as if it is true and later the claim will be cited by adherents as true because “they said so”. Whether it is raw chutzpah or sad ignorance, it is still funny.

    “We call for…Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah! Yaddah!…”

    The typical laundry list of demands by the left is exhaustive and goes to great lengths to set forward what they demand and completely glossing over how they would pay for it. And since many of the things they demand punishes businesses – the sources of wealth – it is hard to reconcile the demands with reality. But that has never been a big concern. What matters is doing something; even if it turns out to be a disaster, at least you did something.

    • I do not necessarily agree that ‘businesses are the source of wealth’. They serve as useful institutions to organize labor into a structure for the purposes of producing something useful, perhaps, but it is ultimately the labor of the organization that produces things, not someone’s merely ‘owning’ something.

      (Of course, the managerial work and organizational framework typically associated with the C-suite officials is certainly labor, and is definitely something which is worthy of compensation as a useful input to the production process. But the ‘owners’ don’t really produce, since ownership is just a product of legal fiat.)

      • “I do not necessarily agree that ‘businesses are the source of wealth’.”

        Liberals never want to admit that business is the source of wealth and sustenance for us all. Yet they are always hard pressed to explain where else it comes from…

        “They serve as useful institutions to organize labor into a structure for the purposes of producing something useful, perhaps…”

        That is very generous of you to acknowledge that business may serve some use in the development of wealth…

        “…but it is ultimately the labor of the organization that produces things, not someone’s merely ‘owning’ something.”

        “merely owning something”, Edward? I was disappointed when you said that. You were engaging in a belabored tap dance at trying to minimize the role of buisness in the process of producing wealth but you stepped on your wanker when you tried to write the business owner out of the wquation. What do you think labor would be doing if the owner had not taken the risk, invested the time, money and sweat into building the business that gave labor the job where it could produce something? Labor would be squatting on it’s haunches in the dirt wondering how it was going to feed itself and it’s family.

        You have never owned a business, Edward. You have never had to worry about making payroll, or balancing the needs of the business against the needs of your employees. You have never faced what it is to meet the requirements of thousands of government regulations while keeping your business competitive and keeping your employees busy and happy. To say that owners of a business only contribute a framework for the true producers (i.e.-labor) is like saying your car only provides a seat for you to sit in.

        The truth is you need both. But leftists only acknowledge labor and want to constantly constrain and punish business. But like the goose that laid golden eggs, once you kill the goose, there are no more golden eggs. If we learned nothing else from the failure of the Soviet Union, we should have learned that government is terrible at running businesses.

        • “You have never owned a business, Edward. You have never had to worry about making payroll, or balancing the needs of the business against the needs of your employees. You have never faced what it is to meet the requirements of thousands of government regulations while keeping your business competitive and keeping your employees busy and happy.”

          That sounds like labor to me. That is carrying out the role of management in carrying out those tasks, which seems to me to be labor based on the definitions I use. And for all of that work, the individual should very much receive worthy compensation for those tasks. I don’t consider the managerial tasks a founder does any different than any other task done by another worker in the firm.

          The question is, of course, how to divide the surplus generated. I think there can and should be a more equitable distribution than ‘one person, who is assigned property rights by legal fiat, gets all of it’. I would like to see more movement toward worker cooperatives, for instance.

          But I really do respect where you’re coming from. I have never owned a business, but my mother started a company (a partnership organized as a LLC) which has become very successful. And she worked her butt off to get the company to where it is. A lot of weeks where we barely got to see her because she was consistently putting in 65+ hours a week. All of that is most definitely a lot of sweat equity. I’m certainly not going to disparage anyone putting in that much time and energy from earning the returns of that effort.

          But I am going to say that I don’t necessarily *earn* much of anything because I throw money into the stock market periodically. I haven’t really produced anything or put anything into the productive process as a result.