Daily Archives: October 5, 2018

September jobs report well below expectations, real earnings decline

Steve Benen has the September jobs report. Job growth cooled in September, falling short of expectations:

Though there were some concerns about the effects Hurricane Florence may have had on the U.S. job market, most projections pointed to monthly job growth in September around 194,000. The initial data suggests we fell short by a significant amount.

The September results are 25 percent below what economists had forecast.

SeptemberJobs

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this morning that the economy added 134,000 jobs in September, while the unemployment rate dropped further to 3.7%. The 134,000 is the lowest of the year to date.

On a more encouraging note, the revisions for the two previous months – July and August – were quite good, with a combined net gain of 87,000 jobs as compared to previous BLS reports.

In terms of the larger context, this morning’s data points to 1.875 million jobs created so far in 2018, which is quite good, and which is an improvement on the totals from the first nine months of 2017 (1.53 million). It’s also roughly identical to the numbers from 2015 (1.84 million) and 2016 (1.85 million).

That said, this year’s tally is still short of the totals from the first nine months of 2014 (2.19 million).

When the White House says this is the best growth “ever,” it apparently means “since 2014.”

As for the political implications, Donald Trump has now been in office for 20 full months – February 2017 through September 2018 – and in that time, the economy has created 3.8 million jobs. In the 20 full months preceding Trump’s presidency – June 2015 to January 2017 – the economy created 4.15 million jobs.

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Tucson Metro Chamber endorsements for General Election 2018

2018 General Election Endorsements


“The Tucson Metro Chamber is YOUR advocate when it comes to ensuring we have a continually improving business climate in Southern Arizona. We champion issues that impact businesses of all sizes. Our 2018-2019 core policy focus areas include: infrastructure and the ability to build and fund necessary assets; workforce development to improve and grow our current and future workers; and creating a business climate that is sustainable and promotes a prosperous community. We strongly believe in electing officials that are collaborative partners who support overall business advocacy needs. In an effort to elect officials who will help achieve those organization policy goals, the Tucson Metro Chamber is endorsing the following candidates:

  • Doug Ducey (R)

    Governor

  • Kimberly Yee (R)

    Treasurer

  • Justin Olson (R)

    Arizona Corporation Commission

  • Shelley Kais (R)

    Arizona District 2, Senate

  • Chris Ackerley (R)

    Arizona District 2, House

  • Daniel Hernandez (D)

    Arizona District 2, House

  • Randall Friese (D)

    Arizona District 9, House

  • David Bradley (D)

    Arizona District 10, Senate

  • Todd Clodfelter (R)

    Arizona District 10, House

  • Mark Finchem (R)

    Arizona District 11, House

  • Gail Griffin (R)

    Arizona District 14, House

     

The Chamber extended interview invitations to all candidates that were on the August primary ballot, holding over fifty 20-minute interviews. A special thanks to our members who serve on the Candidate Evaluation Committee for the tremendous time commitment and effort they put into the interview process. The Candidate Evaluation Committee has even representation from registered Democrats, Republicans, and Independents — just like our Chamber community.

We hope that you will give strong consideration to the candidates when you and your employees cast their ballots. As always, should you have any questions, please give us a call at (520) 792-1212.”

https://tucsonchamber.org/endorsements/

Vote wisely on or before Nov. 6, 2018.




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Kavanaugh confirmation advances to a final vote

Senators voted 51-49 to end debate on Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination, setting up a final vote to confirm Kavanaugh for Saturday afternoon. Kavanaugh advances in key Senate vote:

Kavanaugh’s nomination got a last-minute boost when Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Susan Collins (R-ME) voted to end debate on Kavanaugh’s nomination. Manchin was the only Democrat to vote yes.

Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), however, voted against advancing the nomination, the only Republican to do so.

Senate Republicans acknowledged ahead of time that they might not know the outcome of the vote by the time it started — an unusual move for a leadership team that likes to keep a tight grip on floor action.

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This doesn’t guarantee they will each vote to confirm him. Collins (Maine) voted to end debate but isn’t expected to make an announcement on if she will vote to confirm him until 3 p.m., setting up a must-watch moment on the Senate floor.

Republicans hold a slim 51-seat majority in the Senate, which allows them to lose one vote from their conference and still confirm Kavanaugh without Democratic help.

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Despite massive opposition, Republicans are set to confirm the most unpopular judicial nominee in American history

More than 2,400 law professors sign letter opposing Kavanaugh’s confirmation:

Signatories included Martha Minow — the former dean of Harvard Law School, where Kavanaugh taught a popular course — other law school deans and former deans, and some scholars who previously supported Kavanaugh.

“As someone who knew and liked Brett Kavanaugh when we clerked together, I have tried very hard to stay out of this process and to give him the benefit of the doubt,” said Mark Lemley, a professor at Stanford Law School. But Kavanaugh’s behavior at the hearing last week “was not what we should expect of a Supreme Court Justice. Telling obvious lies about his background, yelling at senators, refusing to answer questions, and blaming his troubles on others is not appropriate behavior.”

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Another letter, signed by about 900 female law professors, asked the Senate to reject Kavanaugh’s appointment. As a law professor, “it is my responsibility to teach my students the highest standards of professionalism and decorum,” Karla McKanders, a professor of law at Vanderbilt University Law School, said in an email. “Judge Kavanaugh’s testimony undermines the legal profession and would undermine the authority of the Supreme Court.”

In an unprecedented move, life-long Republican and Former Justice John Paul Stevens said Judge Kavanaugh is not qualified to sit on the court:

Justice Stevens said he came to the conclusion reluctantly, changing his mind about Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination after the second round of the judge’s confirmation hearings last week. Judge Kavanaugh’s statements at those hearings, Justice Stevens said, revealed prejudices that would make it impossible for him to do the court’s work, a point he said had been made by prominent commentators.

“They suggest that he has demonstrated a potential bias involving enough potential litigants before the court that he would not be able to perform his full responsibilities,” Justice Stevens said in remarks to retirees in Boca Raton, Fla. “And I think there is merit in that criticism and that the senators should really pay attention to it.”

“For the good of the court,” he said, “it’s not healthy to get a new justice that can only do a part-time job.”

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