“The Future of Elections: Who & What Can We Trust?” talk

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11

THE FUTURE OF ELECTIONS: WHO AND WHAT CAN WE TRUST?
A Conversation with the Executive Director of the National Institute for Civil Discourse, Carolyn Lukensmeyer

“As identity politics, partisan incivility, media, and special interests reshape both the country and the vote, this discussion considers the pivotal role of trustworthiness in maintaining a democratic society and whether elections as we know them have a future.”

Truth & Trust in the Global Scene (3 talks)

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11
THURSDAYS, OCTOBER 19 & 26
6:30PM | FOX TUCSON THEATRE

“In our current “post-truth” era of alternative facts and fake news, how do we maintain trust in each other, in our elections, in our journalists and media outlets, and in our governments and world leaders? How do we reclaim truth and rebuild trust? What will the future hold if we can’t? This fall, join the UA College of Social and Behavioral Sciences for a series of discussions with national experts who will explore the current state of American truth, trust, and global relations.”

Tickets are free.

Reserve yours here

http://sbsdowntown.arizona.edu/

2 responses to ““The Future of Elections: Who & What Can We Trust?” talk

  1. Carolyn Classen

    Chris Conover of AZPM moderated a panel discussion with 3 women – Carolyn Lukesmeyer (National Institute for Civil Discourse), Kate Kenski (Associate Prof. in Communication) and Samara Klar (Asst. Prof. in Political Science) about a wide ranging topic of trustworthiness in politics, social media & civility, communication. The wide divide between Republicans and Democrats was of course mentioned, with voter apathy and independents in the middle. Questions from the audience were about what to tell your international friends, how measure trust, what is voter fraud/trust that your ballot counts, will lack of trust lead to a new party, how rebuild Dem values, mandatory voting, voter apathy, why vote on Tuesdays, negative ads, where is the US heading, gerrymandering, how to start the healing process between parties, is there hope for next election in 2018? Revive Civility online (targeting Maine, Iowa, Ohio & Arizona) and Project Implicit are resources. Lukesmeyer did say that 75% of Americans think incivility is at a crisis, that only 25% of the U.S. Congressional seats are in competitive districts.

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