Tag Archives: Native Americans

“Smoke Signals” & “More than Frybread” American Indian films at the Loft

Double Feature!

Smoke Signals & More Than Frybread

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 11 AT NOON | GENERAL ADMISSION: $15 • LOFT MEMBERS, TRIBAL MEMBERS & UA/PCC STUDENTS WITH VALID ID: $10
SMOKE SIGNALS starts AT NOON • MORE THAN FRYBREAD starts AT approximately 1:50pm
PLEASE NOTE: WE CANNOT ACCEPT PASSES OR GROUPONS FOR THIS SCREENING

Co-presented by the UA American Indian Alumni Club and The Loft Cinema.

“Don’t miss this special 20th anniversary screening of the acclaimed 1998 hit, Smoke Signals (presented on 35mm), paired with the hilarious 2012 comedy, More Than Frybread! Miss Native American University of Arizona will be on hand to introduce the films, and delicious homemade frybread will be available for sale on our patio. A portion of the proceeds from this event will benefit the UA American Indian Alumni Club.

Smoke Signals / 20th Anniversary / 35mm film print!

Billed as the first feature film entirely written, directed and acted by Native Americans, director Chris Eyre’s award-winning 1998 Sundance hit Smoke Signals is a funny, touching and honest look at what it is to be Indian in America.

Written by Sherman Alexie, based on four of his own short stories, Smoke Signals follows Victor (Adam Beach) and Thomas-Builds-the-Fire (Evan Adams), two young Idaho men with wildly different memories of one Arnold Joseph (Gary Farmer), a former resident of their Idaho reservation who split years before and has just died in Phoenix. Arnold’s popular, athletic son, Victor, remembers him best as an alcoholic, occasionally abusive father who drove off one day and never came back. By contrast, the highly-quirky, always-talking Thomas Builds-the-Fire, whom Arnold had saved from certain death years earlier, has chosen to romanticize the man’s life and deeds in a way that drives Victor crazy. However, circumstances bring this odd couple together in a funny and funky road trip to Phoenix to retrieve Arnold’s ashes. Along the way, they must confront the reality of Arnold’s legacy, which has profound and unexpected effects on both of them. (Dir. by Chris Eyre, 1998, USA, 89 mins., Rated PG-13)

More Than Frybread

In the deliciously fun, award-winning comedy More Than Frybread, twenty-two Native American frybread makers, representing all twenty-two federally recognized tribes in Arizona, convene in Flagstaff to compete for the first ever, first annual, state of Arizona Frybread Championship!

The film takes a larger-than-life turn as four passionate contestants (Teresa Choyguha, Dey & Nite, Camille Nighthorse and Tatanka Means as hip-hop Navajo frybread rock star, Buddy Begay)”

https://loftcinema.org/film/smoke-signals-and-more-than-frybread-double-feature/

 

 

Minority Elected Officials in Southern Arizona

Someone asked me recently about who are the minority politicians in Southern Arizona. So here’s my list (which is not comprehensive, as I didn’t list Town of South Tucson nor the Native American tribes – where they are the majority), so please let me know by commenting below if I forgot anyone.

Hispanic  Americans:

Raul Grijalva, CD 3 Congressman

Richard Elias, D 5 Pima County Supervisor

Ramon Valadez, D 2 Pima County Supervisor

F. Ann Rodriguez, Pima County Recorder

Olivia Cajero Bedford, LD 3 State Senator

Macario Saldate, LD 3 House

Rosanna Gabaldon, LD 2 House

Daniel Hernandez Jr., LD 2 House

Regina Romero, Ward 1 Councilwoman

Richard Fimbres, Ward 5 Councilman

Luis Gonzales, PCC Governing Bd. (District 5)

Adelita Grijalva, TUSD Governing Board (Raul’s daughter)

Eva Carrillo Dong, Sunnyside School District Governing Board

Robert Jaramillo, Sunnyside Schooil District Governing Board

Beki Quintero, Sunnyside School District Governing Board

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Indigenous Peoples Day at Global Justice Center – updated

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INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DAY
South Tucson, AZ
Monday, October 10, 2016

GLOBAL JUSTICE CENTER
BLOCK PARTY BEGINS 10AM to 9PM
225 E. 26 ST. (between 3rd and 4th Avenues)

“Live Art, Music, Dancers and Speakers throughout the day. Featuring hip hop crew Barrio Mindz, art collective Neoglyphix, and various traditional dancers of the Tohono O’odham, Yaqui, and Calpolli traditions.  See tentative schedule below, subject to change.

Come show your support to make this day a holiday celebrating and honoring Indigenous Peoples’ everywhere!”

RSVP via FB: https://www.facebook.com/events/1807907432762158/

Carolyn’s note: I hear that Code Pink co-founder Medea Benjamin will be making an appearance at this event sometime in the afternoon. See our Calendar for more of her activities while in Tucson.

scheduleindigenous

GOP feigned outrage of the day: Denali (no, seriously)

Ohio Republicans have their panties in a twist that President Obama has authorized Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to restore the name of the tallest peak in Alaska (and the U.S.) to its millennia-old native people’s name of Denali, from Mount McKinley, named after the 25th President of the United States who came from Ohio.

The Washington Post today has the story behind the original name change. How a 19th-century political ‘joke’ turned into a 119-year-long debate:

DenaliThe name Mount McKinley “was little more than a joke.”

That’s according to toponymist George R. Stewart, an expert in American place-names (apparently a real field of academic study).

There was no reason, Stewart explained in his 1945 tome “Names on the Land,” why a New Hampshire gold prospector of little consequence should have been able to christen America’s tallest peak.

But politicians, not toponymists, are the ones who control the nation’s maps, which largely explains how the craggy, ice-bound mountain remained named after America’s 25th president for more than a century.

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