Feeling oppressed? Check out this free theater

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Carolyn Classen
Carolyn Sugiyama Classen, a life long Democrat, was born & raised in the State of Hawaii, was a Legislative Aide for U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye on Capitol Hill, and practiced law for a while. In Tucson she worked as a tribal staff attorney for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe and later was the Interim Executive Director of the now defunct Domestic Violence Commission. In 2008 she became a “My Tucson” guest columnist for the Tucson Citizen newspaper, then continued blogging for Tucsoncitizen.com for over four and a half years. Her blogsite was entitled “Carolyn’s Community” about community events and some political news, until Gannett Publishing shut down the site on January 31, 2014. She started with Blog for Arizona on Feb. 11, 2014. Part time she has been sitting as a Hearing Officer in Pima County Consolidated Justice Courts Small Claims Division since April, 2005. She is married to University of Arizona Distinguished Professor Albrecht Classen, a native of Germany. They have one son, who lives in Seattle, WA with his wife and daughter. She is also the Editor of the Southern Arizona Japanese Cultural Coalition website, www.southernazjapan.org (since Jan. 2013).

1 COMMENT

  1. Facilitators (aka “jokers” Victor and Micha) led about 15 people in this workshop to learn about the Theatre of the Oppressed (T.O.), founded by Brazilians Augusto Boal and Paolo Friere, about “analyzing rather than accepting, questioning rather than giving answers.” Definition of T.O.: a system of theatrical games & techniques that examine & dismantle dynamics of oppression (dealing w/ gender, national origin, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, disability, age, indigenous background). Various games were played with the group today — what’s your name?, power shuffle, 2x3xBradford (with imaginary balls and a partner), and Colombian Hyponis (hypnosis, also with a partner), as well as one with “shifting images”/image theater. Forum theater using real life conflicts was also discussed. Stay tuned for more of these Theatre of the Oppressed workshops.

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