House Speaker Paul Ryan, “the zombie-eyed granny starver from the state of Wisconsin,” was so overjoyed with achieving his boyhood dream of sticking it to the working class, the elderly, the disabled, and the poor — the “takers” as his running mate Mitt Romney once referred to them — that he was practically giddy.

That someone takes such pleasure in causing millions of Americans to suffer is pure evil.

The House has passed the abomination of the GOP tax bill on a party-line vote of 2227-203, with only a dozen Tea-Publicans voting no. House passes final tax bill, edging GOP closer to win:

Arizona Congressional Delegation: YEAHS: Biggs, Gosar, McSally, Schweikert; NAYS: Gallego, Grijalva, O’Halleran, Sinema. Not Voting: Franks (seat vacant).

The Senate is expected to pass the bill later on Tuesday, sending it to President Trump’s desk and allowing the GOP to achieve its goal of rewriting the tax code in Trump’s first year in office.

Multiple protesters interrupted House floor debate on the tax bill Tuesday, including people who shouted “kill the bill, don’t kill us!” as well as a woman in a wheelchair who said she relies on Medicaid and warned that the bill would “starve” the public.

One protester even interrupted Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) as he delivered a floor speech that he’s wanted to give for decades in support of the tax overhaul.

“Today we are giving the [wealthy] people of this country their money back. This is their money, after all,” Ryan said.

A woman in the public visitors’ gallery then shouted, “You’re lying!”

Republicans view the tax overhaul as critical to maintaining their congressional majorities in 2018 — a curious calculation given that the GOP tax bill is deeply unpopular with the American public,
Americans have already made up their minds about the tax bill – and it looks brutal for the GOP
(on average, just 33% of Americans approve of the bill while 52% disapprove) — after having failed this year to fulfill their seven-year pledge to repeal ObamaCare.

The first overhaul of the tax code since 1986 sped through Congress at a rapid pace, from House Republicans first unveiling a bill [drafted in secret without any public hearings or any Democratic input] in early November to passing a final bicameral compromise a month later.

By contrast, the 1986 tax reform effort had bipartisan support and didn’t reach then-President Reagan’s desk until nearly a year after it was first introduced in the House.

* * *

The bill lowers the top individual rate from 39.6 percent to 37 percent, slashes the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent, and creates a 20-percent deduction for income of pass-through businesses that pay taxes through the individual code.

It increases the exemption amounts for the individual alternative minimum tax and estate tax, and it moves the U.S. to a territorial tax system that generally exempts U.S. companies’ foreign earnings from U.S. taxes.

Additionally, the bill effectively repeals ObamaCare’s individual mandate that requires people to buy health insurance or face a tax penalty and allows for drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge — two top priorities for many Republicans.

If Congress does not vote to waive the PAYGO rules, the GOP tax bil will also trigger an automatic $25 million cut to Medicare.

In order to comply with budget rules that allow the Senate to pass the bill with just a simple-majority vote, most of the tax cuts for individuals expire after eight years while the corporate tax cuts are permanent.

The Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) estimated that income groups across the board would on average get a tax cut in 2019. But in 2027, after the individual cuts are set to expire, income groups under $75,000 would on average see their taxes go up.

JCT also estimated that the bill would add $1.46 trillion to the debt over 10 years.

The House Republicans who voted against the bill were mostly lawmakers from New York, New Jersey and California who were troubled by the bill’s $10,000 cap on the state and local tax (SALT) deduction.

Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (N.J.), the chairman of the Appropriations Committee who also voted against the House version of the bill, said he opposed the final measure because of its cap on the state and local tax deduction.

“I had hoped to be able to vote for a pro-growth tax bill. However, H.R. 1 forces New Jersey residents to pay for tax cuts for residents in other states. I voted ‘No’!” he said in a statement.

Rep. Pete King (R-N.Y.), whose Long Island-area district would be negatively impacted by the reduced state and local tax deduction, said he’s gotten negative feedback from his constituents.

“Nothing good. Especially from the Republicans. People who voted for Trump are very disappointed,” King said.

One California Republican who voted against the original House version, Rep. Tom McClintock, received a standing ovation during a GOP conference meeting Monday evening upon announcing he would vote for the final version. All of the other 12 Republicans who opposed the original House version did so again on the final measure.

Only one Republican who does not represent a high-tax state cited the bill’s impact on the deficit as a reason for voting no: Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.).

“I’m all for tax reform, but it must grow the economy, not the debt,” Jones said in a statement.

This abomination of a tax bill is now in the Senate. Stay tuned.

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