UA Museum of Art showcases Japanese woodblock prints

Kunichika, Toyohara. Two Kabuki Actors, ca. 1870-1879; Woodblock print; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John Murphey.

Kunichika, Toyohara. Two Kabuki Actors, ca. 1870-1879; Woodblock print; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John Murphey.

From U of AZ Museum of Art website:

Literally meaning “pictures of the floating world”, Ukiyo-e refers to the famous Japanese woodblock prints genre that originated in the seventeenth century. Informed by depictions of city life, entertainment, leisure, beautiful women, kabuki actors, and landscapes, Ukiyo-e magnified the sophistication of the newly minted bourgeoisie who had found a playground in Edo (modern day Tokyo). This exhibition was curated by Ashley Rubin, M.A. Art History Graduate (and continues to March 15, 2015).
UAMA hours: Monday – Noon-5pm, Tuesday to Friday 9am-5pm, Saturday-Sunday Noon- 4pm
Free for Museum members, students with ID, faculty and staff, military personnel, AAM members, and children. General admission for adults $5.
UAMA is at 1031 N. Olive Rd. (east of Park Ave.) on the University of Arizona campus. It is accessible by Sun Link modern streetcar (on E. 2nd Street just south of the museum, the Olive Street stop), and Sun Tran bus route #4  north of the museum on Speedway Blvd.   Parking is on the street near Park Avenue or north of the Olive Street underpass in the parking

For more information about Japanese cultural events in Southern Arizona, go to www.southernazjapan.org.

One response to “UA Museum of Art showcases Japanese woodblock prints

  1. 23 beautiful, graceful prints by various Japanese woodblock print artists are displayed in their glory. Especially liked a lovely bird one with lotus flowers, several of village life around the capital Edo (now a very different Tokyo), and female courtesans (oiran). There is also a very striking one of a male actor with a blue dragon tattoo on his shoulder. Check it out now, continuing to March 15, 2015 so there’s lots of time.