Why I don’t support anyone in CD8… yet

BandwagonTed has chosen his horse (Rum, Romanism and Rebellion: Why I Am Supporting Gabrielle Giffords) and I respect that, and think that he has made an entirely defensible choice.

But I won’t be doing that. Unlike Ted, nobody I’m aware of gives a crap what I think. And, frankly, that’s probably wise, cause sometimes, upon reflection, I find that I don’t give a crap for what I thought. Me endorsing a candidate would be like farting in a windstorm, not to mention potentially detrimental to my chosen candidate’s fortunes, given my recent preformance at political predictions. So I won’t be doing that.

I might say that I like a candidate, but that’s just the ol’ ‘would you want to have a beer with him/her test’, not a political judgement. And, yes, candidates, you can have a beer with me and other liberals any Thursday at 6:30 PM at The Shanty on 4th Ave. and 9th St. I positively encourage you to do so (besides you’re more likely to make juicy admissions when under the influence). I might also say I agree with a candidate’s positions, but I’ll also say when I don’t, and neither circumstance is a sinecure of my affection, nor a bar to my support. If I think a candidate is a nitwit, a crank, a mediocrity, or a sleezebag, or a liar, I promise to tell you such because sterling personal qualities are the sine qua non of public service IMHO.

I don’t imagine people come here for me to tell them how to vote; but I do hope they come here to find information that will help them decide how to vote.

So there won’t find my frolicking on any bandwagons when there is a contested Democratic primary. My ticket to ride is only good following the nomination party. We’ve got a long way to go before voting, and I, for one, still don’t know nearly enough about any of these CD8 candidates for my taste.

To that end, I’m going to start interviewing candidates at a fair clip in coming weeks to try tease out some things the stump speeches, policy statements, and the traditional media interviews are not catching. My first interview was with Patty Weiss last week. As soon as I straighten out my notes, I’ll be posting my impressions of the candidate. I would like to have a followup with Weiss, but I would like to see some reader feedback first. I’ve got feelers out to both Gabby’s and Jeff’s campaigns, and I welcome any candidate who lets me ask whatever I want, doesn’t try to pre-screen questions, and gives me at least on hour.

0 responses to “Why I don’t support anyone in CD8… yet

  1. I think the Democrats are offering their party some terrific candidates in the coming election.
    I listened to Jeff Lattas and Francine Shacter in
    Patagonia and was very impressed. It’s wonderful to
    see ordinary citizens running for office instead of professional politicians. We need more of that. I’m running as an independent candidate to represent the many registered voters in District 8 who feel that partisan politics is tearing our country apart. From my viewpoint the two party system seems to pit half of us against the other half. In my campaign I won’t be running against anyone or trying to defeat anyone. I’m simply running to offer the voters an additional choice and for the opportunity to bring a different point of view to the process of selecting our Congressional Representatives. It’s my view that Democracy thrives when citizens care enough
    to get involved and it fails when we hire professinal
    politicans to do our work for us. You can learn more
    about my views and campaign by visiting my website
    http://www.AverageJoeForCongress.com

    I believe that both the Democrats and Republicans
    have valid viewpoints but they’ve lost the ability
    to work together to find common ground. The partisan
    debate has become so bitter that they’ve reached the
    point where they would rather win the argument than
    solve the problem. I see partisanship as the problem
    which prevents all problems from being solved. Most
    of the problems we face are in fact opportunities.
    The immigration problem is a case in point. What we’ve
    got there is a terrific opportunity to find solutions
    which work for both countries and make us better neighbors in the process. I share many of the views
    of the Democratic party with respect to social issues.
    Somehow we must find a way to open the hearts of those
    who fear change. I don’t think that attacking them or
    debating them is going to accomplish that. I support
    the right of women to chose but I don’t think that
    being pro-choice means that one is encouraging
    abortions. The pro-life position has validty also.
    Instead of fighting with one another we must bring
    them together for the common cause of preventing
    unwanted pregnancies. There is tremendous energy
    being wasted on fighting that could
    be put to more productive use if we could show them
    ways to work together. I support gay rights
    for the same reason that I support other social issues.
    Tolerance is the glue that holds our society together.
    The vast majority of us live and work togther in
    tolerance. The politicians do not and it serves their
    purpose to try to divide us and convice us that we
    should become intolerant on one another and our
    lifestyles or beliefs. That is how they get
    elected. They try to convice half of us that the other half is somehow a threat to all that we hold dear. It’s
    a vile and divise tactic but it only works if we
    buy into it. I wish the many good Democrats luck in
    the coming election. You have many values that I admire. I hope we can work together to find common
    ground. What we all want is what’s best for the
    world, not just our own country. Looking around the
    planet we witness a bitter fight between the “right”
    and the “left” in country after country. Our’s is not
    the only country split by extreme partisanship. It’s
    a tremendous problem which thus becomes a tremendous
    opportunity to find better ways to live together, if
    we’ve the courage to find better ways to self-govern.

  2. Francine Shacter

    I think the primary election is the place to select a candidate. The best favor for the electorate is to let the candidates have a maximum opportunity to let their postions be heard. In addition, each candidate brings different life experiences to the race. The electorate needs to hear about those. My web page is one place to learn about me: http://www.francineshacterforcongress.com. In addition,I am available to talk to people, in groups or singly.

  3. We love your blog Michael!

    We are holding off on deciding whom to support too, for at least a couple of months.

    Latas has been running a really good campaign with a lot of support from DFA and PDA, but don’t know if we are on the same page on issues. Giffords definitely has the advantage of having the inside track (and money), plus she also has grassroots support from DFA and she is leading for the Democratic nomination. Neither has the name recognition that Weiss has, which will be the big plus in the general and we don’t think either is as progressive as Weiss on the issues. We need to hear more from Weiss though and she doesn’t seem to be running as good of a campaign as Latas and Giffords. Art from Dataport (who decidely is very biased as a pro-Giffords, anti-Weiss blogger) says they were robo calling and at this early stage that is just stupid. They also seem to be ignoring Pima County were in the last 2 elections 83% of the vote cast comes from so again, not a good move. It will be sad if Weiss turns out to be a really good candidate and doesn’t have strong people running her campaign. Reminds me of the Dean campaign where the candidate was better than the campaign.