Daily Archives: November 12, 2018

Oh No She Didn’t!

Cross-posted from RestoreReason.com.

AZ Capitol Times reported today that in response to a Save Our Schools suggestion that voucher expansion should be “sidelined” while the battle for public education funding continues, Kim Martinez, a spokeswoman for the American Federation For Children, said she was “unimpressed”. Martinez also said that, “It is unfortunate that Save Our Schools continues to take a stance against children who need ESAs, a program that helps disadvantaged students who are slipping through the cracks at their neighborhood schools. It is short-sighted to put funding concerns above children whose learning requirements have to be met today.”

Bravo Ms. Martinez, I couldn’t have said it better myself, at least not your words about the urgency of meeting children’s learning requirements. It totally IS short-sighted to put funding concerns above children whose learning requirements have to be met today. It IS totally unacceptable that public school students entering high school next year, have yet to be in an adequately funded classroom. It IS totally unacceptable that the Arizona Legislature continues to favor corporate welfare over ensuring our public schools are adequately funded.

As for your swipe at Save Our Schools for their “stance against…disadvantaged students who are slipping through the cracks at their neighborhood schools”, give me a break! We know that Save Our Schools is fighting for exactly these children and all one million Arizona public school students. We also know that you are fighting for Betsy DeVos and her privatization movement. Neither Save Our Schools, nor our public schools at large, are responsible for “disadvantaged students who are slipping through the cracks. The enemies of these students are 1) poverty and 2) our failure to deal with it.

Our children cannot continue to wait for the adults to understand that education is not an expense, it is an investment. They cannot wait for us to realize that every child matters and deserves the opportunity to succeed. Every day that passes without this as our driving force, is another day of lost opportunity for us all.

The fix is in to appoint Martha McSally to the Senate? (Updated)

I made the point in a post last week, Does Martha McSally have a Plan B?

If Arizona voters reject Martha McSally for the senate in today’s election, it would be an affront to Arizona voters to reward her with a consolation prize of being appointed to Sen.McCain’s seat in December, an appointed term that would run through 2020.

Now, I would expect that resident GOP apologist at the Arizona Republic, Robert Robb, would make the argument that appointing McSally to McCain’s seat is perfectly fine, the will of the voters be damned.

But surprisingly this intellectually dishonest argument is being made today by The Republic’s Laurie Roberts. 1 million voters can’t be wrong. Appoint Martha McSally to the Senate, Gov. Ducey:

It’s Day Seven of election night in Arizona and it’s clear that Democrat Kyrsten Sinema soon will be called Sen. Sinema.

While Republican Party leaders try to regain their temporarily (I hope) lost sanity and get over it, consider this:

Republican Martha McSally soon could be called Sen. McSally.

More than one million Arizona voters wanted to see the former fighter-pilot-turned-southern-Arizona congresswoman in the Senate.

Gov. Doug Ducey could grant them their wish.

Ducey could appoint McSally to the late Sen. John McCain’s Senate seat, the one that placeholder Jon Kyl is expected to leave by year’s end.

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New Rules needed for media coverage of election night and beyond

Elections have long since ceased to be a one day event in America. Most states offer early voting in some form, and California and Arizona in particular offer relatively easy early voting by mail which invariably leads to voters turning in their mail-in ballots on Election Day. That in turn requires time for election officials to verify voter signatures and to count the ballots. It takes time to do it correctly, fairly and accurately.

The numbers the media breathlessly reports in their election night coverage and endlessly speculates about in their media consortium projections are actually a disservice to Americans on Election Day. The media want finality in the limited time frame they have set aside for election night coverage, which is unrealistic and impossible.

It can lead to candidates and political parties leading in those early election night results later concocting unsupported wild conspiracy theories about election fraud when ballots verified and counted in the days and weeks after election night swing to their opponent, as has occurred here in Arizona with Rep. Martha McSally, The Arizona Republican Party and the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee in the U.S. Senate race.

The ultimate consequence of this is to undermine public confidence in our election system and election results.

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Senator Sinema

By Michael Bryan

Kyrsten Sinema has won the election. There is no official count yet, nor any victory announcement or concession. But with a 30K vote lead for Sinema and about 200K ballots left to count, McSally would have to win the remaining vote by 15%; that’s just not going to happen. The race is won; congratulations Senator Sinema on turning Arizona’s Senatorial delegation purple.

McSally, I’m sure, is already lobbying Governor Ducey for McCain’s seat.

 

Why Hillary Clinton has a right to run in 2020.

In 1824 John Quincy Adams, thanks to the Electoral College, became the President of the United States. Four years later, the popular vote winner in that election, Andrew Jackson won the first of two presidential terms.

In 1876 Rutherford B Hayes, in a questionable electoral college tally, beat popular vote winner Samuel Tllden for the Presidency. Tilden probably would have run again in 1880 but ill health prevented him. He would die in 1886.

In 1888 Benjamin Harrison achieved an electoral college victory over incumbent President and popular vote winner Grover Cleveland. Four years later, Cleveland would become the first President to serve two non-consecutive four-year terms.

In 2000, Vice President Al Gore won the popular vote over George W, Bush but a poorly constructed butterfly ballot in Palm Beach (where voters erroneously voted for the Pre Trump Pat Buchanan) and a Republican-friendly Supreme Court tipped the electoral college to George W. Bush. Criticized for the campaign he ran in 2000 (where he did not emphasize the peace and prosperity of the Clinton/Gore Administration), Gore decided not to run in 2004.

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